FALL 2010

SPRING 2011

WELCOME                          2010-2011 SCHEDULE                          ARCHIVE

SPEAKER/EVENT
DATE

   Speaker:  Brie Finegold, University of Arizona TPD

  How The Moore Method informs my style of teaching

Abstract: The Moore Method is a Socratic style of teaching named after R.L. Moore, one of the founders of point set topology.  Today Moore has over 1,600 mathematical descendants.  In this hour I’ll try to spur a discussion amongst those attending to get us thinking about what aspects of this teaching style might be relevant to our own classrooms.

February 1st

Math 501

   Speaker: Sarah Hunter, Math and Science Specialist for Think Tank at U. of A.

Math at the THINK TANK


I'll be giving an brief overview of the THINK TANK and the Student Learning Services department to let folks know some the services we offer. I've been asked about Tutor Training and Hiring and who uses our services, so I'll present numbers on the visits we had for Math classes, focusing on Fall 2010, and talk about hiring and training. I'll finish with a discussion of current issues, pilot projects and future visions, leaving plenty of time (I hope) for discussion about how we can best work with the Math Department to encourage student success in Math classes.

   Speaker: Jason Dyer, University of Arizona Instructor

February 8th

Math 501

   Speaker: Priya Prasad, University of Arizona Graduate Student

February 15th

Math 501

February 22nd

Math 501

   Panel: Erin Militzer, Emily Ronshausen, Sylvia Saccon, and Brie Finegold

     Topic: Experiences with Project NeXT

March 1st

Math 501

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March 8th

Math 501

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March 22nd

Math 501

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April 12th

Math 501

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April 5th

Math 501

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March 29th

Math 501

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April 19th

Math 501

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April 26th

Math 501

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May 3rd

Math 501

 
DATE

   Speaker:  Jason B. Dyer, UA Instructor of Mathematics

Q*Bert Teaches the Binomial Theorem: Creating Videos for Mathematics Instruction

Abstract: Lately the number of videos on the Internet teaching various mathematics concepts has exploded. We will look at and critique a number of videos and learn the tools and methods of making your own. Find out new ways of engaging your students and how motion can improve student understand No camera required!

August 31

Gould Simpson 849

   Speaker: Bill Mccallum, UA Mathematics Professor and Department Head

Topic: Outreach Opportunities for Postdocs

September 7

Math 501

   Speaker: Brie Finegold UA Teaching Postdoc

Abstract: I will give a hands-on means of teaching limits.  This exercise, which I have successfully used in a Calculus for Social Sciences course, is taken from Tom Hull's book entitled Project Origami.

September 14

Gould Simpson 849

   Speaker: Cody Patterson UA Teaching Postdoc

Abstract: Related rates problems rank among the most difficult problems that students in a first-semester calculus course face.  In Fall 2009, J. Hunt, R. Teixeira, and I conducted interviews of about a dozen calculus students to see what obstacles they faced when attempting to solve a challenging related rates problem.  Some students made mechanical errors such as differentiation mistakes, but the greatest source of difficulty for students was an inability to manage the complicated quantitative system that the problem entailed.  I will give some background on quantitative reasoning, discuss the results of our interviews, and talk about some ways in which this study has informed my teaching practice.

September 21

Math 501

   Speakers: Victor Piercey and Matt Thomas, UA graduate students

G-TEAMS: bringing grad students into k-12 classrooms

Abstract: G-TEAMS is an NSF funded grant which allows graduate students in the

sciences to spend a year working in k-12 classrooms. A few of the

fellows and teachers who have been involved will present some of their

experiences with the program and answer questions about what is possible

in these pairings.

September 28

Math 501

   Speaker: Michelle Woodward, UA mathematics

Topic: Online Intermediate Algebra Course

October 5

Math 501

   Speaker: Matthew Felton, Assistant Professor of Mathematics Education

The What, How, and Who of Mathematics: Prospective Teachers' Views of Mathematics as a Social and Political Activity

Abstract: I will discuss my research and teaching on challenging prospective teachers to consider mathematics as a social and political activity. For my dissertation I taught a mathematics content course for prospective K-8 teachers in which I incorporated a variety of perspectives on the social and political dimensions of mathematics. I will share a framework I have developed that focuses on the What, How, and Who of mathematics as a means of understanding mathematics as a sociopolitical activity and of understanding the prospective teachers' views of these issues. Tensions and challenges of engaging in this work will be discussed. Finally, I will share some thoughts on research in mathematics education in general.

October 19

Math 501

   Speaker: Judah Rosenblatt, UA

Title: Replacing Remedial Algebra Courses with Finite Difference Calculus an Alternative with Benefits

Click here for a description

November 9

Math 501

   Speakers: Victor Piercey and Priya Prasad, UA graduate students

Title: Overcoming Math Anxiety

Abstract: We will share our experience working with Sheila Tobias on a workshop helping adults overcome math anxiety.

November 2

Math 501

   Speaker: Barbara Shipman, Associate Professor at University of Texas at Arlington

Abstract: The goal of these materials for undergraduate foundations and analysis is to engage students in actively thinking about and discussing mathematics as a research mathematician would.  The materials have a strong focus on creating concepts and definitions, as well as statements and proofs of theorems, leading to rigorous outcomes that are carefully crafted and understood through the process of constructing, testing, and proving them.   This talk will highlight selected materials, results from independent research on the impact of the work on student learning, feedback from students and faculty, and workshops on incorporating the materials in a variety of ways to engage students in higher-level thinking.  A workshop for faculty at the University of Arizona is in planning.

October 26

Gould Simpson 849

SPEAKER/EVENT